Hammock Camping Laws and Guidelines in All 63 National Parks

November 3, 2021

 posted in: ,

Hammock Camping Guidelines in All 63 U.S. National Parks

hammock camper in the woods

Camping with your hammock is a great way to enjoy the outdoors, especially in the United States’ many beautiful national parks. Before you set up your hammock for the night, it’s essential to know the current guidelines for the national park you are visiting.

Table of Contents

Can You Put a Hammock Anywhere?

Almost all national parks allow hammock camping, and most have specific guidelines regarding their hammock camping policies. Here’s a handy list of hammocking laws and guidelines in alphabetical order by state to use on your next camping trip.

Hammock Camping Laws in American Samoa National Parks

National Park of American Samoa

The National Park of American Samoa does not have a designated campground or allow hammock camping inside the park, according to their visitor guide brochure.

Hammock Camping Laws in Alaska National Parks

Denali National Park

The Denali National Park permits hammock camping in designated campgrounds and backcountry areas according to their laws and policies page.

However, finding a place to hang your hammock may be difficult due to the park’s rocky tundra. Check out some creative ways to hang your hammock without trees.

Gates of the Arctic National Park

Visitors can hammock camp inside the park and backcountry.

However, this park’s camping tips page recommends bringing a hammock stand, as the area is too cold to support tree growth.

Glacier Bay National Park

Glacier Bay National Park’s rules state that visitors must register for a free permit and complete an orientation before hammock camping.

Packing a hammock stand is wise due to the rocky terrain of the park.

Katmai National Park

Katmai National Park’s Superintendent Compendium permits hammock camping in the backcountry. They also have designated campgrounds to use.

Kenai Fjords National Park

Campers can set up hammocks in Kenai Fjords National Park, but they must follow the leave no trace policies during their stay.

Kobuk Valley National Park

Kobuk Valley National Park allows hammock camping for experienced campers. There are few trees in this area, and all visitors must bring a hammock stand.

Lake Clark National Park

Hammock campers may camp wherever they like, according to Lake Clark National Park’s camping and backpacking policies. There are also designated campgrounds for use.

There are no roads in this national park, so visitors must arrive by plane or boat.

Wrangell-St.Elias National Park

America’s largest national park permits hammock camping. There are no maintained trails so that campers can enjoy the natural landscape.

Hammock Camping Laws in Arizona National Parks

Grand Canyon National Park

Hammock camping in the Grand Canyon National Park is allowed as long as campers don’t damage or disturb desert vegetation with nails or other sharp objects.

Their camping information page also states that campers must take down their hammocks when not in use to prevent wildlife from becoming ensnared.

Petrified Forest National Park

The Petrified Forest National Park’s Superintendent’s Compendium permits hammock camping as long as visitors don’t hang their hammock from vegetation.

Saguaro National Park

The Saguaro National Park’s rules and regulations permit hammock camping in higher elevations, where trees grow.

Campers should never attach a hammock to saguaro cacti, which are a protected species in the park.

Hammock Camping Laws in Arkansas National Parks

Hot Springs National Park

The Hot Springs National Park’s Superintendent’s Compendium allows hammock camping in the designated campground and requires visitors to follow the leave no trace principle.

Hammock Camping Laws in California National Parks

Channel Islands National Park

Hammock campers must stay in designated campgrounds even in backcountry locations at Channel Islands National Park.

Plan for your visit by packing a hammock stand, as there aren’t many trees available.

Death Valley National Park — California and Nevada

The Death Valley National Park permits hammock camping, according to their general rules and regulations.

Joshua Tree National Park

The Joshua Tree National Park’s rules and regulations do not permit hammocks in the campgrounds.

To go hammock camping outside a designated campground, you must use free-standing supports to protect the vegetation.

Lassen Volcanic National Park

Lassen Volcanic National Park has seven campground sites available for hammock campers.

Backcountry camping isn’t allowed.

Pinnacles National Park

Hammock camping is an option at Pinnacles National Park. According to the guidelines, campers must stay in designated camping areas and trails to remain safe and protect the wildlife.

Redwood National Park

Hammock camping is only allowed at Redwood National Park with a hammock stand.

The camping page of this park’s website states that hanging your hammock from any of the trees in this park may cause damage or mutilate the bark.

Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Park

Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Park’s rules and regulations permit camping with a hammock in designated campgrounds or the backcountry.

Campers must use minimal impact hanging techniques or a hammock stand to avoid damaging the trees or altering the landscape.

Yosemite National Park

Yosemite National Park allows hammock camping with a few restrictions.

When hanging your hammock either in a designated camping area or in the backcountry, it cannot create a hazard, and you must use extra padding to prevent damage to the trees.

Hammock Camping Laws in Colorado National Parks

Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park

The Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park allows hammock camping. The park discourages camping in the backcountry due to personal safety risks and higher chances of a bear encounter.

Learn more on the Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park’s policy page.

Great Sand Dunes National Park

The Great Sand Dunes National Park’s rules and regulations prohibit hammock camping.

Mesa Verde National Park

Hammock camping is permissible in Mesa Verde as long as campers stay within the designed campground.

While staying at the campsite, all campers are under a leave no trace policy.

Rocky Mountain National Park

Rocky Mountain National Park’s rules and regulations allow limited hammock camping within the campgrounds.

Campers must bring a hammock stand to prevent damage to the surrounding vegetation.

Hammock Camping Laws in Florida National Parks

Biscayne National Park

According to the laws and policies page, hammock camping at Biscayne National Park is on a first-come, first-serve basis.

This park features many palm trees, making it an ideal location to hang your hammock.

Dry Tortugas National Park

The Dry Tortugas National Park prohibits hammock camping due to a high wildlife presence on the island, as stated in their brochure.

Hanging your hammock from a tree can also cause severe damage.

Everglades National Park

The Everglades National Park permits hammock camping with a stand to prevent tree damage.

Plan your trip to the park by visiting their page.

Hammock Camping Laws in Hawaii National Parks

Haleakalā National Park

Campers can use hammocks in the Haleakalā National Park if they use the correct padding when hanging their hammocks.

You can find more information in the Superintendent’s Compendium.

Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park

Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park permits hammock camping.

All visitors are under a leave no trace policy, according to the Superintendent’s Compendium.

Hammock Camping Laws in Idaho National Parks

Yellowstone National Park — Idaho, Montanna and Wyoming

Visitors hammock camping at the many campsites in Yellowstone National Park should exercise caution.

Many of the park’s animals may run into your hammock if you leave it hanging when not in use. Backcountry camping is also an option in this park.

Hammock Camping Laws in Illinois National Parks

Gateway Arch National Park — Illinois and Missouri

The Gateway Arch National Park does not permit camping of any kind.

For updated information about this park, please visit their basic information page.

Hammock Camping Laws in Indiana National Parks

Indiana Dunes National Park

There are no specific restrictions against hammock camping in the Indiana Dunes National Park.

Their rules and regulations state that campers can’t camp for longer than 14 days in a period of 30 days.

Hammock Camping Laws in Kentucky National Parks

Mammoth Cave National Park

Mammoth Cave National Park visitors can hammock camp as long as they use minimally damaging hanging techniques.

The park’s rules and regulations prohibit driving sharp objects into trees or disturbing wildlife.

Hammock Camping Laws in Maine National Parks

Acadia National Park

Acadia National Park’s rules and regulations permit overnight hammock camping in designated areas.

During the day, you can use your hammock outside the campgrounds.

Hammock Camping Laws in Michigan National Parks

Isle Royale National Park

Isle Royale National Park allows hammock camping in suitable tent sites.

The rules and regulations state that campers cannot set up hammocks at shelter sites or inside shelters.

Hammock Camping Laws in Minnesota National Parks

Voyageurs National Park

There are no specific rules or regulations against hammock camping in the Voyageurs National Park.

Before your visit, remember that many campsites at this park are only accessible by boat.

Hammock Camping in Missouri National Parks

Gateway Arch National Park — Missouri and Illinois

The Gateway Arch National Park does not permit camping of any kind.

For updated information about this park, please visit their basic information page.

Hammock Camping in Montana National Parks

Glacier National Park

The Glacier National Park’s Superintendent’s Compendium permits hammock camping inside designated sites.

There are limited trees, so make sure to bring a hammock stand.

Yellowstone National Park — Montana, Wyoming and Idaho

Visitors hammock camping at the many campsites in Yellowstone National Park should exercise caution.

Many of the park’s animals may run into your hammock if you leave it hanging when not in use. Backcountry camping is also an option in this park.

Hammock Camping in Nevada National Parks

Great Basin National Park

The rules and regulations for Great Basin National Park don’t have specific laws against hammock usage.

All campers must keep a clean campsite during their stay.

Death Valley National Park — Nevada and California

The Death Valley National Park has designated areas for hammock camping.

Since there are few trees, you may want to bring a hammock stand.

Hammock Camping in New Mexico National Parks

Carlsbad Caverns National Park

Carlsbad Caverns National Park does not have any campgrounds for visitors but does allow hammock camping in the backcountry.

All campers must obtain a free permit when they arrive on-site.

White Sands National Park

There are no hammock camping sites in White Sands National Park, and backcountry camping is not allowed.

However, there are hammock camping options available outside the park.

Hammock Camping in North Carolina National Parks

Great Smoky Mountains National Park — North Carolina and Tennessee

The Great Smoky Mountains National Park doesn’t permit hammock camping in designated campgrounds.

However, you can hammock camp in the backcountry if you obtain a valid permit in advance.

Hammock Camping in North Dakota National Parks

Theodore Roosevelt National Park

The Theodore Roosevelt National Park permits hammock camping with a free permit, provided you do not damage any trees when you hang your hammock.

Hammock Camping in Ohio National Parks

Cuyahoga Valley National Park

Cuyahoga Valley National Park no longer offers designated or backcountry camping in the park.

Visitors can explore camping options outside the park.

Hammock Camping in Oregon National Parks

Crater Lake National Park

Campers can use hammocks inside Crater Lake National Park.

Their rules and regulations state that campers must wrap padding around where they place their hammock straps to protect the trees from damage.

Hammock Camping in South Carolina National Parks

Congaree National Park

Congaree National Park is hammock friendly, with hammock camping sites inside the park and in the backcountry.

Hammock Camping in South Dakota National Parks

Badlands National Park

Badlands National Park permits hammock camping in their many campgrounds.

Since there are few trees, you may want to bring a hammock stand.

Wind Cave National Park

Wind Cave National Park only allows camping in the backcountry.

All hammock campers must obtain a free permit upon arrival.

Hammock Camping in Tennessee National Parks

Great Smoky Mountains National Park — Tennessee and North Carolina

The Great Smoky Mountains National Park doesn’t permit hammock camping in their designated campground.

However, you can hammock camp in the backcountry with a valid permit.

Hammock Camping in Texas National Parks

Big Bend National Park

Hammock camping is permissible inside the park by reservation only and with a permit for backcountry camping.

All hammocks must use free-standing structures to preserve the natural landscape.

Guadalupe Mountains National Park

The Guadalupe Mountains National Park’s rules and regulations permit hammock camping with a stand to protect the natural features.

Hammock Camping in Utah National Parks

Arches National Park

Arches National Park’s rules and regulations allow hammock camping.

Since there are few trees, you may want to bring a hammock stand.

Bryce Canyon National Park

Campers may use hammocks in designated campgrounds, but only with free-standing supports according to the rules and regulations.

Campers cannot hang hammocks and other items from the trees.

Canyonlands National Park

The Canyonlands National Park’s Superintendent’s Compendium allows hammock camping provided you use a stand.

The park prohibits tying hammocks or slacklines to vegetation.

Capitol Reef National Park

Hammock camping is only permitted in designated campsites during the day according to the rules and regulations and must not cause damage to the surrounding landscape.

Zion National Park

Zion National Park limits hammock camping to your campsite.

Make a reservation before your trip to ensure you have a camping spot.

Hammock Camping in Virginia National Parks

Shenandoah National Park

Shenandoah National Park’s rules and regulations allow hammock camping inside the park and in the backcountry.

Hammock Camping in Virgin Islands National Parks

Virgin Islands National Park

The Virgin Island National Park only permits hammock camping in designated sites at the Cinnamon Campground per the Superintendent’s Compendium.

Hammock Camping in Washington National Parks

Mount Rainier National Park

Mount Rainier National Park allows hammock camping by permit only.

North Cascades National Park

North Cascades National Park’s rules and regulations permit hammock camping, provided campers follow leave no trace policies.

Olympic National Park

The Olympic National Park permits hammock camping at its many campsites.

All campers must follow leave no trace policies.

Hammock Camping in West Virginia National Parks

New River Gorge National Park

Hammock campers can stay at the New River Gorge National Park in a designated campground or backcountry.

Bringing a hammock stand is a must as their camping page notes that campers cannot drive nails or hang anything from the trees.

Hammock Camping in Wyoming National Parks

Grand Teton National Park

All hammock camping at Grand Teton National Park’s designated campsites is by reservation only.

Yellowstone National Park — Wyoming, Idaho and Montana

Visitors hammock camping at the many campsites in Yellowstone National Park should exercise caution.

Many of the park’s animals may run into your hammock if you leave it hanging when not in use. Backcountry camping is also an option in this park.

Trust DutchWare for All Your Hammock Needs

Wherever your journey takes you, trust DutchWare to make your trip convenient and comfortable. We carry a wide range of hammocks and outdoor gear guaranteed to withstand whatever nature throws at you. To learn more about our products, please contact us today!

Leave a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.